Noverre Cinema 3

The Noverre Cinema returns to The Assembly House

On Friday 21st April the ballroom of The Assembly House will be once again become the Noverre Cinema and will hold a public screening for the first time in over twenty years.

The Assembly House Trust is teaming up with Cinema City Education to revive one of Norwich’s long-lost cinemas for one-night-only.

The much-missed cinema is returning as part of a year of activities celebrating the heritage of one of Norwich’s most beloved public buildings. The event will be accompanied by a special exhibition charting the history of The Assembly House.

Noverre Cinema

The title of the film and ticket details are still to be announced but we are keen to collect memories of the cinema for as part of the event.

What are your memories of the Noverre Cinema?

Get in touch by emailing info@assemblyhousetrust.org.uk or tweeting @AHHeritage

Noverre Cinema 2

About The Noverre Cinema

For more than 40 years, the Noverre served as a popular city cinema which screened a diverse range of films including non-commercial and arthouse releases.

Located in a former ballroom at the Assembly House in Norwich, the cinema took its name from the Noverre family who taught classical dance there during the 18th Century.

Prior to the Noverre’s opening, the Assembly House underwent extensive restoration work between 1948 and 1950 for a cost of £70,000. When it re-opened in November 1950 the building was complete with music rooms, a banquet room and exhibition room, in addition to the arts cinema.

A raked floor was installed which accommodated 272 seats. The cinema was well equipped with two 35mm projectors, two 16mm projectors and modern sound installation.

The Noverre is fondly remembered for its Saturday morning kids’ club, seating with plenty of leg room, showing no adverts before films and for not selling ice creams or popcorn. The most popular film it screened was Cabaret, which was shown on 11 different occasions.

The Norfolk & Norwich Film Theatre began showing films at the Noverre in 1966 before moving into their permanent venue, Cinema City on St Andrews Street, in 1978. The NNFT screened a variety of, sometimes controversial, foreign and arthouse pictures that were otherwise unavailable to view in Norfolk.

The Noverre closed its doors on 23 December 1992.